366 projects

2009

Before 2010, farmers in New York did not have access to online pesticide applicator recertification credits based on material developed in New York and relevant to their farming operations. Additionally, Cornell Cooperative Extension faculty and field staff did not have an online infrastructure for providing their audience with material qualifying for recertification credits.

2009 to 2013

The Foodprints and Foodsheds project identifies the potential for local food systems based on regional soils information, food production estimates, population maps and dietary guidelines. The area needed to feed one person or a whole population center is calculated using GIS and optimization models. Minimizing the distance food must travel or maximizing economic return to land are factors that can be optimized.

2009

Operation: Military Kids (OMK) is a collaborative effort with America’s communities to support military kids impacted by the Overseas Contingency Operations. An official, nationwide program launch occurred on April 6, 2005, led by Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley. New York was one of the original Operation: Military Kids states. Operation: Military Kids provides support to military
children and their families before, during, and after the

2009 to 2010

The Cornell Cooperative Extension Sea Grant Program worked with the Army Corps of Engineers and Stony Brook University to develop a Regional Sediment Management program for the state's Atlantic coast. This effort brought together federal, state and local interests to identify problems and opportunities for better management and utilization of coastal sediments to protect coastal resources and to maintain natural transport processes to protect the environment and mitigate the impacts of erosion and sea level rise on New York’s coast.

2009 to 2011

Grower adoption of Cornell research-based recommendations including narrow plant spacing and alternative mulches dramatically reduce losses from bacterial bulb decay and increase profitability, thus sustaining the small-scale onion industry.

2009

Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans infects both tomato and potato crops worldwide, and is responsible for major losses in both crops. Never before has late blight been introduced into such a wide area of the Northeast because of massive distribution from big box sale of infected tomato transplants. The public needed to be informed on this event because it affected every individual growing these crops, either commercially or for home garden enjoyment.

2009

The Capital District Vegetable & Small Fruit Program is one of the premier regional agricultural Cornell Cooperative Extension programs in New York, serving a large multi-county area in the Capital Region of the state: Albany, Columbia, Fulton Montgomery, Greene, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, Warren, and Washington counties. The team's specialists work together with Cornell faculty and extension educators statewide to address the issues that impact the vegetable and small fruit industries.

2009

Plants comprise the foundations of agriculture and food systems. Plant breeding serves to generate improved cultivars that are more nutritious, sustainably grown and flavorful.

2009

Plant pathologists from all over the Northeast collaborated in monitoring the outbreak of potato and tomato late blight that was initiated in June 2009 and continued into the fall. The reports of late blight occurrence warned commercial growers, home owners, and organic growers that the disease was prevalent and that mitigation procedures should be initiated.