912 projects

2012 to 2013

While New York state is urging coastal property owners and managers to use living shorelines as the preferred method for erosion control for environmental reasons, these audiences didn't have the information they needed to make intelligent choices regarding the suitability of this approach for their particular sites. New York Sea Grant organized a workshop that brought together top experts in this field to share their expertise with New York audiences.

2012

A cornerstone of IPM is plant problem diagnosis. We make a year-round effort to assist producers of ornamental commodities in NY with their pest diagnosis. When faced with a known pest issue, growers have an opportunity to look at the pest lifecycle and the big picture of their operation and determine which practices may be adjusted in their production systems. During the growing season, troubleshooting takes place though examination of plants in greenhouses and fields, as well as through delivered samples and submitted photos.

2012 to 2013

The Cooperative Enterprise Program collaborated with the Northeast Cooperative Council (NECC) to deliver the Future Cooperative Leaders Conference targeted towards farm operators and employees who have demonstrated potential in leading cooperative businesses in the future. Forty-one persons from 12 cooperatives (doing business in NY, PA, New England), and 4 states attended the conference. Cornell Cooperative Extension educators and NY Farm Net staff attended as well. Commodities represented included dairy, field crops, grapes, and nursery crops.

2012

An on-farm field day was held to inform farmers of the benefits of subsurface tile drainage. The event was planned by three CCE regional and the local soil and water conservation districts. The topic of soil health was broad to cover multiple commodities.

2012 to 2015

In support of NYS RISE and the NYS Department of Agriculture and Markets’ efforts to
enhance the State’s rapid detection and response capabilities, Cornell University’s NY Extension
Disaster Education Network (NY EDEN) developed a comprehensive system to rapidly collect
targeted information about agricultural sector emergencies. This system has been integrated into
efforts to develop a state wide Cornell Cooperative Extension standard operating procedure and
all-hazards protocol. Cornell University’s Cooperative Extension Service (CCE) has

2012

When "super storm" Sandy opened a new inlet on the south shore of Long Island, threatening developed areas, the National Park Service requested New York Sea Grant's coastal processes specialist to assist their inter-agency Breach Assessment Team, composed of 35 federal, state and local officials, in evaluating the situation and managing the feature. The specialist provided the group with information on potential breach impacts and worked with university researchers to develop a monitoring program that would provide information needed to properly manage the breach.

2012

The Cornell Small Grains Breeding and Genetics Project has released a new spring oat variety called Corral with exceptionally high grain yield and disease resistance. This variety is resistant to barley yellow dwarf virus and is more lodging resistant than other oat varieties, thus increasing the efficiency of production for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits.

2012 to 2015

This project screened Norway rats from New York City to better understand the risks of human-rodent interactions. Norway rats were found to be infected with several known and novel pathogens, and carried ectoparasites such as fleas that are capable of transmitting pathogens to humans.

2012 to 2014

We evaluated use of wild fish and game in the diet of 3 key stakeholder groups in the Finger Lakes region of New York State: locavores, food-insecure families, and families of hunters and anglers. We explored current use of wild-caught meat, how the fish and game was procured, and potential barriers to consuming these foods. We also analyzed meat from brook trout, ruffed grouse, and Canada geese and added the results to the USDA National Nutrition Database.

2012 to 2013

CCE NY EDEN responded to Hurricane Sandy based on previous experience with Hurricanes Lee and Irene. As a result of this response, CCE gained in creased visibility and relevance in disaster readiness and response, which will be increasingly important as intensity and frequency of storms and emergencies continue to rise.