1506 projects

2014 to 2017

The goal of this project is to understand the life history and evolutionary genomics of recenlty discovered mycoplasma-related endobacteria (MRE) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, subphylum Glomeromycotina). To this end, we sequenced, assembled, annotated, and analyzed MRE metagenomes associated with three AMF species. This work revealed that MRE gene content is highly reduced, suggesting metabolic dependence on the AMF hosts. Remarkably, the MRE genomes harbor multiple genes horizontally acquired from AMF.

2014

The Small is Beautiful project provided reimbursements for garden-based supplies to eight Cornell Cooperative Extension garden-based learning projects across New York State, reaching over 700 youth and adults. Five of these gardens would not have been able to get started without this assistance.

2014

The Winter Dairy Management program was held at 10 different sites across New York State. It's intended audience was dairy farmers, agriculture students and agriservice professionals. 296 people participated in the program. Program evaluations indicated that the program was very successful in providing information that farmers would use on their farms to increase profitability.

2014 to 2016

There is significant incentive and interest in developing reduced- or non-chemical approaches for managing root-feeding pests in turfgrass, however, the successful development of such practices presents major challenges. Chief among these challenges is a poor understanding of soil characteristics which determine pest distribution in turf soils. The short-term objective of this project will be to conduct a field study to identify soil chemical and physical properties that explain distributional patterns of turf root pests on golf courses and home lawns.

2014 to 2015

Container traps baited with a food attractant are often promoted as a technique to reduce yellowjacket populations without the use of pesticides. There has been little or no work on whether the traps reduce the risk of being stung. Continuing on work initiated in 2006, we tested the premise that trapping around a periphery of a plot will reduce the number of yellowjackets in the center of the plot. The assumption was made that the fewer the yellowjackets, the less the risk of being stung. During 2015, we also began testing if adding a surfactant to the bait increased captures.

2014 to 2015

In order to provide growers, retailers and consumers options, other than banned invasive plants we spearheaded the effort along with Cornell’s invasive species group to compile a list of alternative plants.

2014 to 2015

In the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy NY Sea Grant worked with State officials and marina industry representatives to help business get the resources they needed to begin to recover from this disaster. NYSG documented storm related losses and assisted industry leaders and state officials in identifying, implementing and increasing awareness of grant programs to facilitate recovery efforts. These efforts helped marinas receive over $10 million in storm recovery grants representing the largest percentage of money awarded for any small business sector in the state.

2014 to 2015

Determining the impact of pesticides on the environment, workers and consumers can be a complex matter, but NY State’s IPM program has been making it easier for growers to decide which pesticide to use for over twenty years. The Environmental Impact Quotient (EIQ) is the formula that simplifies the process. Devised and maintained by the NYS IPM program it is used by growers and crop advisors from NY, the US and abroad. EIQ users enter their crop specifics into the on-line calculator to compare the impact of different pesticides.

2014

When superstorm Sandy opened a breach through Fire Barrier Island both development and natural resources were affected. NY Sea Grant assisted local managers in better understanding the potential impacts of the breach by funding research and disseminating the information through workshops and meetings. Managers are using this information to develop scientifically sound responses for managing this feature

2014 to 2017

This project involves the design, implementation, and evaluation of tools that incorporate computational analysis techniques to support frame reflection into the processes of online political engagement. This work involves both the application of existing analytic methods and the development of novel computational techniques, as well as evaluation in two real-world settings: in public deliberative forums and with readers of political blogs.