523 projects

2011 to 2013

With the tax pressure on marginal land increasing, there is an apparent interest in putting productive agricultural crops back onto such land. Our research aims to determine what crops are the best options for environmental sustainability and integrity.

2011 to 2015

The migration of birds between seasons and, at times, between continents has been the subject of some of the earliest ornithological studies. Yet, we still know little about the cues that birds use to decide when to start a migratory route and the factors that determine the routes that birds take. This information has practical implications because collisions between birds and man-made structures (e.g., tall lighted buildings, towers, tall wind turbines) occasionally cause substantial mortality of migrating birds.

2011 to 2013

One of the options available to New York State to revitalize rural communities is the conversion of disused dairy farms to natural beef production. The demand for natural beef is well documented, and can be seen at the level of both individual consumers and restaurants. This program assesses the costs associated with raising beef naturally and the viability of using former dairy land for natural beef production.

2011 to 2015

Our laboratory has acquired four types of full-fat and de-fatted microalgal biomass from biofuel production research that contain 14 to 38% crude protein and 2 to 9% crude fat. We have conducted a series of experiments to determine the safety and nutrient efficacy of supplementing these four types of biomass up to 25% in the diets of weanling pigs, broiler chicks, and laying hens.

2011

Can a pest insect can be modified so that it will not reproduce or not be able to carry a pathogen that causes a disease of humans or crops? With discoveries of modern science and genetics, the answer is clearly ‘yes.’ Using techniques of genetic engineering, insects can be modified in the lab so they can’t reproduce or transmit a pathogen. The modified insects can then be released in the field to mate with pest insects. The results will be a crash in the pest population, reduction of damage, and decrease in the use of pesticides.

2011

The size, shape, and function of an organ is determined by the number, size, and type of its constituent cells. How the growth and division of cells is coordinated with the specialization of cells for particular functions is not well understood. To answer this question, we have developed the outermost leaf-like floral organ of the small plant Arabidopsis, its sepal, as a new model system for organogenesis.

2011

The objective of this project is to initiate discussion across the social sciences and humanities (such as Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future and the Society for the Humanities) about issues of inequality, precarity, and changing economic conditions and aspirations.

2011 to 2018

In this study we are identifying the single and combined effects of plant compensatory responses to pests and diversity at a field and at a landscape scale to reduce pest pressure and increase yield in a more sustainable way. Plant compensatory responses allow plants that have been damaged by pests to yield as much or even more than undamaged plants. Our previous work has shown that potato tuber production can be doubled by low-level infestation of the tubers by the Guatemalan tuber moth, an important potato pest in Colombia.

2011 to 2017

The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) was first discovered in the mid-Hudson Valley from a homeowner infestation in December 2008 and is now present in 35 New York counties. The study of the biology and ecology of this invasive insect through weekly survey and monitoring efforts will provide agricultural producers with timely updates throughout the growing season to assist in pest management decision making.

2011

This work will provide solutions for minimizing microbial biofilm formation and pathogen contamination in food processing plants, thus reducing the incidence of food-borne illness.