1506 projects

2014 to 2016

This applied research project assesses the incidence and potential management of this emergent pest in on-farm demonstration plots using established trapping and monitoring techniques and tactics, with the collaboration and cooperation of CCE area Extension educators and private consultants, integrating their efforts with research protocols overseen by the co-PIs.

2014

Ecological research is increasingly concentrated at particular locations or sites. How well does site-based research represent broader areas? We provided an overview of this issue based on observations for the Hubbard Brook (HB) site. The feasibility of scaling up from intensive sites depends upon the phenomenon of interest and the characteristics of the site. For example, the HB site is representative of Northern Forest region in regard to effects of and recovery from acid rain.

2014 to 2017

We are evaluating the impact of pest management intensity along with the effects of pesticide identity, frequency, and rate of application on beneficial soil microbes and invertebrates. Our goal is to identify practices that meet current pest management needs, but also preserve soil ecological services.

2014 to 2016

There is growing public concern in the Northeastern U.S. over pesticide use on school and community playing fields. However, there are limited options available for alternative pest management practices for school grounds. Our project will assess the impact of repetitive overseeeding as an alternative pest management practice on school sports fields.

2014 to 2017

The oak wilt pathogen had been discovered for the first time in NYS in 2008 and in the same location again in 2013, because of this, I wanted to learn if it was located in other areas around the state where if it becomes established, NYS could lose a significant number of oak trees.The oak wilt

2014 to 2016

As regional extension staff has decreased the need to efficiently and effectively use staff time and resources has increased. Sharing successful programs across the region offers an opportunity to reach more producers with the limited staff available. Four indepth short courses where offered via webex video conferencing to 205 dairy farmers. Each course provided 15-20 hours of lecture and hands on farm experience.

2014 to 2017

Insect distribution in soil is influenced by the amount, distribution, and composition of soil organic matter (SOM). For years, there has been interest in using SOM amendments for mitigating damage by soil-dwelling pests, and studies in row crops and orchards have shown that organic matter manipulations can suppress insect pests and promote beneficial arthropods. The feasibility of such practices in turfgrass, however, has not been well studies. Practices focusing on SOM as a pest management tool in turf may provide additional benefits to soil.

2014 to 2015

In this study, we propose to uncover the soil biota responsible for conferring drought tolerance in tall fescue (Lolium arundinacea L.). The objective of the study focuses on measuring plant-based traits, with a detailed molecular and morphological analysis of soil biological characteristics to determine if specific groups of soil microbiota and invertebrates are correlated with the gradient of drought tolerance. Our long term goal will be to tease apart the biotic mechanisms responsible for greater drought tolerance in drought tolerant turfgrass cultivars.

2014 to 2016

Release of the oocyte from the ovarian follicle at ovulation must occur with precise timing and be localized to the outer surface of the ovary in order to insure successful delivery of the oocyte into the female reproductive tract and fertilization. The mechanisms that control the site of follicle rupture have not been determined.

2014 to 2017

Studying Colorado potato beetles, a major pest of potatoes, we will measure how plant resistance and temporal variation in predator presence affect the non-consumptive and total effect of the stink bug predator on the beetle life time fitness and plant damage including effects on the next generation that is not exposed to predation. We will measure physiological, behavioral and developmental mechanisms by which beetle larvae compensate for responses to predation risk and how these contribute to fitness in the presence of additional stresses.