366 projects

2012 to 2013

Fraser fir is considered a premium tree and is favored by many NY Christmas tree growers, unfortunately it often suffers from root rot and sudden death. Over the past few years our work looked at three components of the problem in order to develop solutions for growers. In 2012 and 2013 we looked at the relationship of soil characteristics with tree death at four NY farms.

2012 to 2014

Virtually no research has been conducted on dairy cattle diet during the immediate postcalving period. Research in our laboratory demonstrated that rations that are more fermentable and provide more substrate for liver gluconeogenesis improved feed intake and milk production and decreased circulating concentrations of physiological markers related to negative energy balance, indicating improved metabolic health in these cows.

2012 to 2013

A field study was established in 2012 to evaluate the effect that vigorous cultivation (rototilling) may have on improving the efficacy of currently registered herbicides. The target weed, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), has deep rhizomes that often allow it to escape complete control with available herbicides. If a late summer rototilling can reduce the size of the rhizomes and bring them closer to the surface, then fall-applied herbicides should be more effective in preventing the smaller rhizomes from regenerating shoots the following spring.

2012

Greenhouse production represents a high-value segment of NYS agriculture with a wholesale value greater than $200 million annually. Greenhouse floriculture crops are often subjected to stressful environments (such as temperature extremes and drought stress) in both the greenhouse and consumer environment. Enhancing plant tolerance to abiotic stresses would enhance grower profitability and consumer success with greenhouse grown plants. We have investigate the role of silicon as a beneficial fertilizer element to enhance plant abiotic stress.

2012

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a new invasive insect pest of soft-skinned fruit crops. Unlike most fruit flies that only infest overripe and rotten fruit, female SWD will lay eggs in ripening and ripe fruit and therefore, represents a significant threat. Our research has focused on learning more about the general biology of SWD and developing and testing short and longer-term pest management strategies as well as communicating results of our research to fruit growers in NY and surrounding states.

2012

A collaborative effort between extension and research staff of the Lake Erie Regional Grape Program (LERGP) at the Cornell Lake Erie Research and Extension Laboratory (CLEREL) and area growers provided the information needed to more accurately predict freeze damage for Concord grape production in the Lake Erie region.

2012 to 2015

Small grains provide multiple benefits to organic farms, but are often underutilized because of their relatively low economic value. Our value added grains project has added value in multiple ways to wheat and specialty grain crops to substantially increase their production and enhance the diversity and sustainability of organic farms. By providing the farmer with rotation options the efficiency of production is increased for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits. Specialty grains grown organically are environmentally friendly crops and help reduce soil erosion.

2012

We are working to frame a regional discussion around Agriculture Economic Development vis-à-vis the NYS Regional Economic Development Councils. CCE's Harvest NY initiative focuses on a region that intersects with 3 regional economic development councils.

2012

Season extension techniques researched and promoted by the Cornell Vegetable Program allowed a NY grower to harvest tomatoes beyond the first frost. The Harvest New York team was then instrumental in connecting this production with the Southern Tier Foodbank, providing access to local, nutritious vegetables to low-income populations.

2012

The New York State Field Crop Weekly Pest Report provides timely pest information to field crop extension educators and agricultural professionals. The report compiles weekly pest and crop observations collected by field crop extension personnel across New York. In addition, the weekly report provides a vehicle to disseminate other relevant integrated pest management (IPM) information, such as pest identification, scouting techniques, and a calendar with suggestions for pest management activities.