216 projects

2015 to 2016

We developed a desktop application called ‘Cluster’ to spatially analyse pixelated data in digital photographs. The user isolates target entities (clusters) by designating up to 24 pixel colours as non-targets and applying a threshold slider to visualise the targets. The app calculates the percent area occupied by targeted pixels and identifies the centroid and compass angle of orientation for each cluster. Anomalous clusters can be interactively deselected and excluded from analysis.

2015

The continuing IPM In-depth programs are a successful way of providing insect management to growers with a record of grower implementation.

2014 to 2016

In this project, we aim to characterize the mechanisms by which gut microbes, either pathogenic or commensals, affect the gut epithelium. In particular, we are interested in understanding how microbes alter stem cell activity, and the cross talk between immune and developmental pathways in the gut.

2014

Collective efforts by regional grape programs gathered winter damage data on grape vines resulting in NY Ag and markets to allow farm wineries to purchase out-of-state fruit or juice from 15 grape varieties that were found to be damaged

2014

The Small is Beautiful project provided reimbursements for garden-based supplies to eight Cornell Cooperative Extension garden-based learning projects across New York State, reaching over 700 youth and adults. Five of these gardens would not have been able to get started without this assistance.

2014 to 2017

The goal of this project is to understand the life history and evolutionary genomics of recenlty discovered mycoplasma-related endobacteria (MRE) of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, subphylum Glomeromycotina). To this end, we sequenced, assembled, annotated, and analyzed MRE metagenomes associated with three AMF species. This work revealed that MRE gene content is highly reduced, suggesting metabolic dependence on the AMF hosts. Remarkably, the MRE genomes harbor multiple genes horizontally acquired from AMF.

2014 to 2015

Container traps baited with a food attractant are often promoted as a technique to reduce yellowjacket populations without the use of pesticides. There has been little or no work on whether the traps reduce the risk of being stung. Continuing on work initiated in 2006, we tested the premise that trapping around a periphery of a plot will reduce the number of yellowjackets in the center of the plot. The assumption was made that the fewer the yellowjackets, the less the risk of being stung. During 2015, we also began testing if adding a surfactant to the bait increased captures.

2014 to 2015

A free application for Apple platforms, called 'Leaf Doctor' was further developed and tested in collaboration with A/Prof. Scot Nelson, University of Hawaii at Manoa. The program analyzes a photograph of a diseased leaf and quantifies the area affected by disease (severity) with high accuracy and precision.

2014 to 2016

Release of the oocyte from the ovarian follicle at ovulation must occur with precise timing and be localized to the outer surface of the ovary in order to insure successful delivery of the oocyte into the female reproductive tract and fertilization. The mechanisms that control the site of follicle rupture have not been determined.