343 projects

2015 to 2017

Vast amounts of research studying the use of social technologies have helped develop a deep, rich understanding of how such technologies mediate and are embedded in complex sociotechnical milieux. Technology use, however, is but one aspect of such systems. A less-studied complementary aspect is technology non-use. In instances where particular technologies become seemingly nearly pervasive, intentional and pointed absence of that technology becomes both analytically conspicuous and potentially informative.

2015

As one of three State-Appointed Monitors to study and make recommendations to NY State, we have made extraordinary progress in understanding, building relationships, and designing a path forward to heal the East Ramapo Community. This community, with 8000 predominantly poor, minority students and 24,000 ultra-orthodox Jewish children attending private yeshivas, and been embroiled in a local community struggle over control of the public school system, severe fiscal stress, and first amendment rights and responsibilities.

2015 to 2017

This project brings together a group of scholars working on the extractive industries, initially in a workshop that was held at Cornell in October of 2015. The group has subsequently decided to collect the papers presented at that workshop along with additional, solicited papers in an edited volume that will be published by Routledge as part of its series on Extractive Industries and Development. In February of 2016, I received a fellowship from the Rockefeller Foundation (Bellagio Center) to work on the volume, and that work has continued throughout the year.

2015 to 2017

Under this initiative, I have have helped the United Nations' efforts to train policy-makers across several African countries. The idea is to help them appreciate and be ready to respond to population changes that are expected in the region for the next half century. One of these changes is a remarkable increase in the size of the youth population, but also in urban residence and education. These changes have dramatic implications for the services and infrastructure that need building as well as the social changes/disruptions to be expected.

2015

In November 2015, the two co-leaders for Cornell Garden-Based Learning (CGBL), Marcia Eames-Sheavly and Lori Brewer, hosted a three-day partnership convening at Light on the Hill, a retreat center in Van Etten, NY; we received a CALS diversity grant to offset the cost of this retreat. We invited representatives of the New York State Food Banks, Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, and community members and campus-based professionals with important perspectives.

2014 to 2017

This project involves the design, implementation, and evaluation of tools that incorporate computational analysis techniques to support frame reflection into the processes of online political engagement. This work involves both the application of existing analytic methods and the development of novel computational techniques, as well as evaluation in two real-world settings: in public deliberative forums and with readers of political blogs.

2013 to 2015

Our work is trying to build a research foundation to inform land grant and other university outreach work that is intended to engage with and influence local policy audiences. We are attempting to empirically characterize decision making processes and normatively understand how the academy might more effectively pursue a goal of better supported locally made informed public decisions, especially in the face of policy complexity and controversy

2013

The Tata-Cornell Agriculture and Nutrition Initiative (TCi) is a long-term research initiative focusing on the design and evaluation of innovative interventions linking agriculture, food systems, human nutrition, and poverty in India. TCi focuses on action research to 1) increase household income and local food supply through productivity growth; 2) increase micronutrient food availability through crop diversification and food fortification programs; 3) ensure intra-household equity in food access through behavior change; and 4) improve access to clean drinking water and sanitation.

2013

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2013

The Cornell Institute for Climate Change and Agriculture (CICCA) serves as a focal point to facilitate research, education, and outreach to help farmers in the Northeast become more resilient to extreme weather and climate variability and reduce their impact on climate change, through increased use of renewable energy and adoption of best management practices.