63 projects

2011

Graduate students in the Department of Landscape Architecture were engaged in the adaptive re-use of a former Brooklyn industrial site for both neighborhood and regional recreational use. The project was engaged through the office of Michael VanValkenburg Associates, which was contracted to execute the project.

2011

This course is designed for biology majors to provide lab experience with emphasis on the processes of scientific investigation and to promote collaboration, communication, and literacy in science. Students gain scientific skills used by biologists to construct new knowledge. Lab topics include genetics, evolution, microbiology, ecology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. The course modules follow the “crawl, walk, run” approach to develop the capacity of students to solve increasingly challenging problems with greater independence.

2010

The Cornell Dairy Fellows Program is designed for students who are interested in careers related to the dairy industry. Approximately 140 students participate in the Fellows Program each year. The program integrates a set of courses addressing the disciplines in the industry, industry and farm visits, in-depth farm analysis, seminars with industry leaders, industry conferences, exchange programs, international trips, and summer internships in dairy-related careers. These experiences allow students to apply their knowledge, skills, and mind-set in multiple real-life situations.

2010 to 2013

There is a growing recognition that while individual food decisions are important determinants of nutrition and health, factors external to the individual and the food system itself play a significant role.

2009

A two-day, on the farm course for cattle operators focused on understanding reproductive anatomy, physiology and insemination techniques. Both classroom and hands-on training was utilized. Partnering with the AI industry and receiving a state grant to support the project ensured both expertise and affordability. Participants went home with the experience and tools to work towards inseminating their own cows.

2009 to 2013

The goal of the proposed project is to provide international research training experience in various disciplines within the biomedical field to undergraduate and graduate students. This training has the purpose of creating awareness of opportunities and motivating students to pursue professional careers in the health sciences, which could contribute to addressing issues and providing solutions to minority health disparities.

2009

Graduate students in the Department of Landscape Architecture engaged the complex re-design of Grand Army Plaza in Brooklyn, NY. They engaged organizations and agency regulations in the multiple design projects. They engaged the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens and the Prospect Park Alliance. They were responsible for issues of transportation, pedestrian-first access and agency regualtions such as strom water management as related to NYSDEC regulations and the City of NY plaNYC regulations.

2009

Students in the life sciences often take science courses taught in a traditional lecture format during their first two years. We know that students appreciate a good lecture that explains concepts well and provides a good overview of a complex topic, but we also know that students need to work through problems related to the lecture on their own time.

2008

Only by looking over a time span almost three times the age of most high school students does the tight connection between wetland science and politics become evident. Most students have a limited view of environmental science. I took the invitation to deliver one of the 25th Anniversary Nosanchuck Memorial Lectures at Ithaca High School to give students a longer perspective -- from the Swamp Lands Acts of the mid-1800's to recent wetland decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court.

2008

The issue is connecting consumers with farmers. As the economy worsens, consumers need to see the value of purchasing fresh foods from local farmers. By learning the basics of food preservation, consumers can expand on the value of what they purchase locally. By taking the classes, many of the consumers were introduced to foods that came directly from farmers at farmers' markets in their own county. Once they could taste and preserve the bounty of New York for a longer period of time, the consumers also realized that they could find this food close by.