1506 projects

2016

This project is being developed to bring newly developed methods of garden archaeology to a site excavated at Pompeii in the early 19th century before modern recording methods were developed.

2016

The NYS Field Crop Weekly Pest Report provides timely pest information to field crop extension educators and agricultural professionals. The report compiles weekly pest and crop observations collected by field crop extension personnel across NYS. In addition, the weekly report provides a vehicle to disseminate other relevant IPM information such as pest identification, scouting techniques and a calendar with suggestions for pest management activities.

2016

As educators struggle to balance competing demands on time, they continue to voice a need for outstanding program planning resources that are relevant and readily available. Many frequently speak to the importance of an outdated publication from the early 90s which had considerable content value, but until recently existed as an obsolete PDF and which was in need of updating.

2016

Bumble bees are important pollinators of crops and wildflowers, but pesticides and parasites have been linked to their declines. This study seeks to compare the performance of experimental bumble bee colonies across landscapes (natural and suburban areas) and farming practices (conventional agriculture and organic agriculture). The research is being conducted by a Masters student, Nelson Milano.

2016 to 2017

The garlic industry in New York has gone through rapid growth in recent years and has an estimated value of $25M at the farm gate. White rot disease, caused by the fungus Sclerotium cepivorum is a destructive disease of Allium spp. It causes major losses to onion and garlic worldwide and occurs in many parts of USA, but is of restricted distribution. The disease has not been reported in NY for many years. However in 2016, samples of garlic from several farms in NY were received from CCE agents and were diagnosed as S. cepivorum.

2016 to 2018

In recent years there have been several stories in the popular media about individuals finding “ticks” in their Christmas trees. While this finding is not consistent with tick biology, members of the NYS IPM Program decided that the question of whether ticks can be found on Christmas trees should be scientifically evaluated. A total of nine Christmas tree farms in New York State were evaluated for the presence of ticks, including three in each of the following areas: Hudson Valley, Capital District, and Ithaca.

2016

Through interviews with farmers and agricultural service providers, and other community and economic development organizations, The Our Farms, Our Stories Project sought to better understand and communicate the needs and opportunities of Tioga County's farms and farmers, particularly in the context of broader community and economic develompent.

2016

Despite the increasing demand for crop pollination and growing consumer preference toward local honey, NYS beekeepers are experiencing excessive and unsustainable colony losses. These losses totaled 54% in 2014 alone, exceeding what beekeepers consider economically sustainable (15-20%) and the national average (42%). The prevalence of Varroa, Nosema, and viruses in colonies, as well as beekeepers’ management practices used to control them, are currently unknown for NYS. These parasites and pathogens have negative implications on NYS agriculture.

2016 to 2018

Carpenter bees are wood-destroying insects that are capable of drilling through wood to create nests. Because these insects are viewed as pests, they are often controlled by pest professionals with insecticide dusts. The goal of this project was to evaluate the use of homemade carpenter bee traps to reduce the population of female carpenter bees, which are responsible for causing the damage to wood. Twelve traps were set out at six sites with current carpenter be damage, and collected 54 carpenter bees: 21 males and 33 females.

2016

The complexity of ecological communities creates challenges to understanding multi-host parasite transmission. Pronounced heterogeneity in transmission among individuals, species and across space is the rule rather than the exception. Community ecologists are beginning to make great strides in predicting multi-species interactions using a trait-based rather than taxonomic approach, identifying key functional attributes of organisms and environments that are important to understanding the system.