26 projects

2013 to 2016

Investigating the impacts (alone, and combined) of high temperature and drought on corn production. This includes identifying possible management and breeding strategies to reduce or eliminate the negative impacts of these climate stresses on corn production.

2013 to 2020

My work focuses on the ecological and social potential of urban rivers, and especially on integrating changing environmental conditions and cultural values through design. I am interested in how landscape architecture, with its history of constructing beloved outdoor places that are also ecologically resilient, can learn from and contribute to the critical issues and possibilities that come together in urban rivers. My geographic focus includes New York state and South America, in part because these two geographies share many characteristics and histories.

2010

The viticulture and enology steering committee created a quarterly electronic newsletter, Appellation Cornell, to provide in-depth research articles written for laypersons, as well as faculty profiles, student profiles, industry profiles, and brief articles to highlight research, extension, and teaching activities of Cornell's Viticulture and Enology Program to a national and international audience. In its first year, readership comprised 1000 to 1500 online subscribers in 45 states, three Canadian provinces, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Fifty articles were published in 2010.

2009 to 2012

Powdery mildew is one of the world's most destructive diseases of grapevines. We know that infection of grapevines occurs as soon as they begin to grow in spring, but epidemics seem to stall for about six weeks and go nowhere fast. We've found that it's our cold nights that are suppressing the disease. Two modes of action are suggested. First, cold nights stimulate a temporary defense response in the youngest, and ordinarily most-susceptible, leaves. Second, cold causes direct damage to the mildew colonies.

2009

New York has great potential to expand the cultivation of sustainable, perennial crops for the production of woody biomass—for heat and bioenergy and as a feedstock for biofuels—on under-used agricultural land.

2008 to 2011

The primary focus of this project is to support the existing and expanding grape and wine industries in New York and other states east of the Rocky Mountains by increasing the abilities of grape producers and their advisers to manage infectious diseases that limit profitability and preclude sustainable production if not addressed adequately. Additionally, the project has several components that are applicable to the grape industry in the western U.S. and to those in overseas locations.

2008 to 2009

Executive education programs provide strategic and financial benefits to both the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and CALS. Executive education programs have contributed in excess of $2.5 million to the operations of the Food Industry Management Program (FIMP) for the period 2001-2009. Moreover, the impact of these programs extends well beyond FIMP to help create the virtuous cycle of outreach, teaching, and research that exists in the undergraduate program in the Dyson School.

2008 to 2012

My program emphasizes research and extension on the biology and control of virus diseases of vegetable and fruit crops. A primary research goal is to understand how viruses cause diseases by studying the molecular and genetic basis of virus-host interaction and virus-vector relationship as well as genetic diversity of virus populations. Increasing our knowledge of the mechanisms of virus infection will facilitate the design of more effective and environmentally friendly control strategies.

2008

I develop cost-effective methods of producing food fish and shrimp in an environmentally sustainable manner and work with developing countries to assist in implementing new businesses.

2008

Neotropical Birds Online (http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu) is an innovative collaboration of researchers, birders, and the conservation community that provides an authoritative online resource with life histories of neotropical birds. We cover the region from Mexico and the Caribbean through all of South America, including the 4,000 bird species that occur there. Neotropical Birds Online provides a survey of the life history of each species.