7 projects

2010

The viticulture and enology steering committee created a quarterly electronic newsletter, Appellation Cornell, to provide in-depth research articles written for laypersons, as well as faculty profiles, student profiles, industry profiles, and brief articles to highlight research, extension, and teaching activities of Cornell's Viticulture and Enology Program to a national and international audience. In its first year, readership comprised 1000 to 1500 online subscribers in 45 states, three Canadian provinces, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Fifty articles were published in 2010.

2008 to 2011

The primary focus of this project is to support the existing and expanding grape and wine industries in New York and other states east of the Rocky Mountains by increasing the abilities of grape producers and their advisers to manage infectious diseases that limit profitability and preclude sustainable production if not addressed adequately. Additionally, the project has several components that are applicable to the grape industry in the western U.S. and to those in overseas locations.

2008

My research projects have focused on odor-mediated interactions between flowering plants and insect pollinators across the spectrum of specialized-to-generalized pollination systems (yuccas, night-blooming tobaccos, thistles). This program is largely exploratory and nonapplied; technological limits and historical bias have resulted in historical neglect of the basic importance of floral scent to pollinator attraction and avoidance of natural enemies.

2007

Selectable marker genes are widely used for the efficient transformation of crop plants. In most cases, selection is based on genes for antibiotic or herbicide resistance, which are most efficient. Due mainly to consumer and grower concerns, considerable effort has been put into developing strategies to eliminate marker genes from plants after transformation. However, these methods are generally of low efficiency.

2003

Fruit farmers and turfgrass managers must produce pesticide and fertilizer records on demand for EPA Worker Protection, NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation, food safety audits, food processors, produce brokers, eco-markets, organic certifiers, etc. Trac Software has been documented to improve pesticide application record keeping and to facilitate generating reports. Since its invention in 2003 by Juliet Carroll, NYS IPM Program, over 500 fruit farmers in New York and worldwide have obtained Trac Software, and 98 percent continue using it.

1999 to 2014

Improved crop varieties are required to remain competitive in the global economy. Agricultural resources are increasingly allocated to benefit the large producer. However, the growing movement toward consumption of locally grown produce has made small- and medium-sized farms profitable.
The development of strawberry, raspberry and blackberry varieties adapted to temperate climates will help diversified growers remain profitable and competitive with large producers in tropical and subtropical climates.

1955

Cold-hardy, disease-resistant wine grape varieties are helping fuel the rise of the grape and wine industry in New York and other regions of the U.S. Along with expansion of this agricultural industry comes a significant boost to the economy through tourism (retail, restaurants, winery visitors, hotels, tasting room sales of related products, etc.). There is continuing demand for new, high-quality wine grapes that can reduce pesticide applications, reduce the cost of production, and expand the range of sites on which grapes can be grown.