8 projects

2013 to 2018

The sensory representation of the external chemical world in the brain is a translation of chemical features into patterns of brain activity. It is the nature these patterns—how that are established by stimulant patterns, how they vary in a population, and ultimately how they interact with other brain functions, e.g. emotions (joy) or behavior (buying wine)—that is the object of our research. We study aroma perception in order to provide information about food composition to producers that will allow them to produce likable, healthy and more profitable products.

2010

The viticulture and enology steering committee created a quarterly electronic newsletter, Appellation Cornell, to provide in-depth research articles written for laypersons, as well as faculty profiles, student profiles, industry profiles, and brief articles to highlight research, extension, and teaching activities of Cornell's Viticulture and Enology Program to a national and international audience. In its first year, readership comprised 1000 to 1500 online subscribers in 45 states, three Canadian provinces, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Fifty articles were published in 2010.

2009 to 2012

Powdery mildew is one of the world's most destructive diseases of grapevines. We know that infection of grapevines occurs as soon as they begin to grow in spring, but epidemics seem to stall for about six weeks and go nowhere fast. We've found that it's our cold nights that are suppressing the disease. Two modes of action are suggested. First, cold nights stimulate a temporary defense response in the youngest, and ordinarily most-susceptible, leaves. Second, cold causes direct damage to the mildew colonies.

2008 to 2011

The primary focus of this project is to support the existing and expanding grape and wine industries in New York and other states east of the Rocky Mountains by increasing the abilities of grape producers and their advisers to manage infectious diseases that limit profitability and preclude sustainable production if not addressed adequately. Additionally, the project has several components that are applicable to the grape industry in the western U.S. and to those in overseas locations.

2007

eClips is a digital database of 10,000 clips and more than 40 podcasts, focused on entrepreneurship, business, and leadership. The material is based on hundreds of in-depth interviews as well as business presentations. eClips makes it possible for business people (including small business owners and entrepreneurs), educators, and students to find targeted and focused information, because it is organized by entrepreneur, company, demographics, topics, and keywords.

2007 to 2020

Quality wine production depends on maintaining proper microbiological control during the transformation of grape juice into wine and its conservation. Our research provides microbiological techniques that allow winemakers to reduce microbial products, which can cause negative effects—such as headaches—to wine consumers, thus increasing the percentage of consumers able to take advantage of the health benefits related to moderate wine consumption.

2007

It`s no surprise that severely diseased grapes make poor wine. However, we found that even trace levels of powdery mildew set in motion a sequence of events that results in severely downgraded and wine that could not be sold. The damage is not due to the powdery mildew itself, but to how it shifts the naturally occurring (and normally beneficial) microbial community on grape berries towards one that produces foul flavors and odors during winemaking.

1955

Cold-hardy, disease-resistant wine grape varieties are helping fuel the rise of the grape and wine industry in New York and other regions of the U.S. Along with expansion of this agricultural industry comes a significant boost to the economy through tourism (retail, restaurants, winery visitors, hotels, tasting room sales of related products, etc.). There is continuing demand for new, high-quality wine grapes that can reduce pesticide applications, reduce the cost of production, and expand the range of sites on which grapes can be grown.