7 projects

2008 to 2009

Executive education programs provide strategic and financial benefits to both the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and CALS. Executive education programs have contributed in excess of $2.5 million to the operations of the Food Industry Management Program (FIMP) for the period 2001-2009. Moreover, the impact of these programs extends well beyond FIMP to help create the virtuous cycle of outreach, teaching, and research that exists in the undergraduate program in the Dyson School.

2007 to 2012

The goal of the project is to build capacity in small- to medium-size firms in rural markets. Through applied research and capacity-building workshops, small agribusiness companies are targeted. Each component of the outreach and research program was evaluated. Workshops were consistently rated as highly effective, and the impacts of the program were measured by expanded sales and adoption of new technologies. Since the program begin in 2003, sales have steadily increased for the companies in the program/workshops. The outcomes of the programs have indicated the workshops are effective.

2007

Over a billion people in the world live on under a $1 a day. They suffer from under nutrition, hunger, illness, and lack of education. What policies, macroeconomic and microeconomic, can best uplift their level of wellbeing? The answer to this question is profound, and extremely difficult. It is a lifetime`s work.

2007

This project examines how recent declines in fertility in several African countries may affect the schooling of children and the inequalities in schooling among children.

2007

We research, design, develop, and apply advanced software and hardware tools for monitoring terrestrial and marine wildlife, and use results to assess the potential impacts of human activities on the environment and endangered or threatened species.

2007

Starting in January 2008, the joint Cornell and University of Ghana West Africa Centre for Crop Improvement (WACCI) program began training 40 Ph.D. students from West African countries in plant breeding and genetics, with eight students admitted each year for the next five years.

2000 to 2014

Executive education programs provide strategic and financial benefits to both the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and CALS. Executive education programs have contributed in excess of $2.5 million to the operations of the Food Industry Management Program (FIMP) for the period of 2001-2009. Moreover, the impact of these programs extends well beyond FIMP to help create the virtuous cycle of outreach, teaching and research that exists in the undergraduate program in the Dyson School.