16 projects

2013 to 2020

My work focuses on the ecological and social potential of urban rivers, and especially on integrating changing environmental conditions and cultural values through design. I am interested in how landscape architecture, with its history of constructing beloved outdoor places that are also ecologically resilient, can learn from and contribute to the critical issues and possibilities that come together in urban rivers. My geographic focus includes New York state and South America, in part because these two geographies share many characteristics and histories.

2013 to 2016

Investigating the impacts (alone, and combined) of high temperature and drought on corn production. This includes identifying possible management and breeding strategies to reduce or eliminate the negative impacts of these climate stresses on corn production.

2008

My research projects have focused on odor-mediated interactions between flowering plants and insect pollinators across the spectrum of specialized-to-generalized pollination systems (yuccas, night-blooming tobaccos, thistles). This program is largely exploratory and nonapplied; technological limits and historical bias have resulted in historical neglect of the basic importance of floral scent to pollinator attraction and avoidance of natural enemies.

2008 to 2011

The primary focus of this project is to support the existing and expanding grape and wine industries in New York and other states east of the Rocky Mountains by increasing the abilities of grape producers and their advisers to manage infectious diseases that limit profitability and preclude sustainable production if not addressed adequately. Additionally, the project has several components that are applicable to the grape industry in the western U.S. and to those in overseas locations.

2008

Neotropical Birds Online (http://neotropical.birds.cornell.edu) is an innovative collaboration of researchers, birders, and the conservation community that provides an authoritative online resource with life histories of neotropical birds. We cover the region from Mexico and the Caribbean through all of South America, including the 4,000 bird species that occur there. Neotropical Birds Online provides a survey of the life history of each species.

2007

Intellectual property rights for plants have increased private investment and breeder numbers. This study examines the effect on the quality of wheat germplasm in the state of Washington. Using state variety testing data, the intellectual property rights (IPR) system was found to lead to more productive varieties from both public and private breeders.

2007

eClips is a digital database of 10,000 clips and more than 40 podcasts, focused on entrepreneurship, business, and leadership. The material is based on hundreds of in-depth interviews as well as business presentations. eClips makes it possible for business people (including small business owners and entrepreneurs), educators, and students to find targeted and focused information, because it is organized by entrepreneur, company, demographics, topics, and keywords.

2007 to 2013

We use the tools of molecular biology to document the biodiversity of birds and other animals and to explain their behaviors, ecologies and evolutionary histories. Our research program integrates studies of evolutionary trees (phylogenetics), speciation, hybridization, animal behavior, ecology, disease ecology and conservation genetics.

2007

This project includes a comprehensive taxonomic study of the vascular systems of several paleoflora that outcrop in Patagonia, Argentina. The major goal is to characterize the exceptionally diverse flora and to understand the origin and diversification of several extinct and modern taxa during the K-T boundary and the early Eocene Climatic Optimum (EECO, 52 million years ago) in Patagonia. The results will have a significant effect on understanding the floristic composition of these paleoflora and the diversity and richness of Patagonian flora in general.

2007

Apple replant disease occurs worldwide and was previously controlled by methyl bromide soil fumigation. We continue to evaluate non-chemical methods for controlling this serious disease problem, and studying the microbial bases for its causation and control. Our recent work has shown that several new rootstocks developed at Cornell have substantial resistance to this soil-borne disease, and may eliminate the need for soil fumigation.