5 projects

2008 to 2009

Executive education programs provide strategic and financial benefits to both the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and CALS. Executive education programs have contributed in excess of $2.5 million to the operations of the Food Industry Management Program (FIMP) for the period 2001-2009. Moreover, the impact of these programs extends well beyond FIMP to help create the virtuous cycle of outreach, teaching, and research that exists in the undergraduate program in the Dyson School.

2007

Apple replant disease occurs worldwide and was previously controlled by methyl bromide soil fumigation. We continue to evaluate non-chemical methods for controlling this serious disease problem, and studying the microbial bases for its causation and control. Our recent work has shown that several new rootstocks developed at Cornell have substantial resistance to this soil-borne disease, and may eliminate the need for soil fumigation.

2007

At the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2008, two workshops were held in New York City and Brooklyn, N.Y., for Chinese food importers and Russian food importers, respectively. Imported foods from these countries represent the largest number of recalled, violative foods that were discovered through inspections and investigations conducted by the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets Division of Food Safety and Inspection.

2007 to 2011

Prior to the findings of this research, there were no research-based guidelines for juice manufacturers to target for percentage of rotted fruit for juice production or intervention methods to reduce patulin levels below regulatory limits. The findings suggest that the targeted culling rates for apples to be less than 0.1 percent of Penicillium expansum-infected fruit to ensure less than 50 ppb of patulin in the finished juice.

2000 to 2014

Executive education programs provide strategic and financial benefits to both the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management and CALS. Executive education programs have contributed in excess of $2.5 million to the operations of the Food Industry Management Program (FIMP) for the period of 2001-2009. Moreover, the impact of these programs extends well beyond FIMP to help create the virtuous cycle of outreach, teaching and research that exists in the undergraduate program in the Dyson School.