3 projects

2007

Apple replant disease occurs worldwide and was previously controlled by methyl bromide soil fumigation. We continue to evaluate non-chemical methods for controlling this serious disease problem, and studying the microbial bases for its causation and control. Our recent work has shown that several new rootstocks developed at Cornell have substantial resistance to this soil-borne disease, and may eliminate the need for soil fumigation.

2007 to 2020

Quality wine production depends on maintaining proper microbiological control during the transformation of grape juice into wine and its conservation. Our research provides microbiological techniques that allow winemakers to reduce microbial products, which can cause negative effects—such as headaches—to wine consumers, thus increasing the percentage of consumers able to take advantage of the health benefits related to moderate wine consumption.

2007

Selectable marker genes are widely used for the efficient transformation of crop plants. In most cases, selection is based on genes for antibiotic or herbicide resistance, which are most efficient. Due mainly to consumer and grower concerns, considerable effort has been put into developing strategies to eliminate marker genes from plants after transformation. However, these methods are generally of low efficiency.