162 projects

2007

Soil health defines the fitness of a soil for its intended use. In food production systems, a healthy soil is one that sustains plant productivity while maintaining environmental quality, promoting plant and animal health, and sustaining livelihoods. Evaluating soil health requires indicators that can be used to assess changes in soil condition over time and in response to soil management. Chemical, physical and biological indicators have all been proposed and many have been implemented successfully in soil health assessments in New York State.

2007

This project is investigating the relationship between business and financial risks faced by Chinese (and eventually Indian) farmers with the aim of understanding the flow of formal and informal credit, credit rationing, and credit availability to small-holder farmers; and to identify new opportunities for credit access, including risk-contingent micro-credit. A major study has been undertaken to understand the lender-borrower relationship and the economics of lending on trust versus lending on collateral.

2007

The Agricultural Marketing and Management Program Work Team's (PWT) mission is to give New York food and agriculturally related businesses a competitive advantage over the rest of the world by significantly improving marketing knowledge and general management capacities and skills. The PWT is committed to exploring new ways to improve communication and resource sharing between on-campus, off-campus, and external stakeholders to accomplish the mission of the team. As part of these efforts, the PWT sponsors the annual Cornell Strategic Marketing Conference each fall.

2007

Documenting immigrant Latino families' diverse cultural practices, values and beliefs as strengths and resources rather than as barriers to education is critical for creating educational settings which foster success rather than failure. Research in Pennsylvania and rural New York documents how Latino immigrant families in recent areas of migration and settlement make sense of what it means to raise children in a new environment.

2007 to 2009

As developing countries have been adopting Geographical Indications legislation (essentially an extension of applications of origin beyond wine and spirits) the literature has suggested broad benefits for producers and rural employment. Our work shows that the opportunities for these benefits are limited while in many cases any benefits will go to establiched land owners, not farm workers.

2007

My research collaboration with Mark Rank has demonstrated that poverty in post-industrial society cuts across race, gender, age, and social class categories. Existing anti-poverty programs, however, are designed around assumptions based in an industrial society where poverty primarily affects specific groups. New York's communities will therefore require new approaches to deal with new realities.

2007

We estimated the costs of reducing the noncontamination of cold smoked salmon with Listeria bacteria at a smoked fish plant. These costs first increase moderately for increases in noncontamination from current levels of noncontamination, but costs become prohibitively expensive to completely eliminate the incidence of contamination. These incremental costs at various levels of noncontamination can be compared to the health benefits of noncontamination to help establish social optimal levels of noncontamination.

2007

Assisting the NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) in protecting, restoring, conserving, and sustaining the natural resources in the Hudson River Estuary through its Action Agenda.

2007

My efforts with the New York State Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Program address the management and reduction of environmental, health and economic risks from pests and pest management techniques, including pesticides. My work encompasses pests of communities, schools, homes, municipal facilities, hospitals, parks, and all non-agricultural settings.

2007 to 2009

We have studied the family food decision-making system and developed a framework for studying family food decision-making and guiding education and action programs. This framework provides insight into the complexity and dynamics of the system. In this research, families and educators who work with families report the most difficult stage in the food decision-making process is moving from behavioral intention to actually implementing the behavior.