139 projects

2007

Gourmet mushroom cultivation is a non-timber, potentially lucrative, forest crop suitable for agroforestry/forest farming in the Northeast. We are investigating limiting factors in forest mushroom production including substrate tree species, mushroom species, and moisture management.

2007

An educational board game developed at Cornell University in the Northeast Sun Grant Institute of Excellence is designed to teach students and the public the concepts and steps involved in converting various biological starting materials into biobased transportation fuels--from the farm to the fuel pump. The game also emphasizes the important benefits of research by allowing players who land on a "Cornell R&D" spot to advance more rapidly toward the goal.

2007 to 2012

We have conducted numerous street tree inventories around New York while working with the USDA Forest Service's software for quantifying the benefits of street trees. Student Weekend Arborist Teams (SWAT) are trained to take this data using hand-held data collecting units. The economic and environmental services street trees provide are quantified for each community and will be extrapolated to include all of New York state.

2007 to 2012

The Cornell Population Program is an interdisciplinary, inter-college research and educational effort focused on understanding the determinants and consequences of population change in the world today.

2007 to 2010

This program provides a a bilingual (English-Spanish), farm-experienced, and culturally knowledgeable individual to dairy farms to: train Hispanic employees, provide facilitation between management and workers, develop or translate existing protocols, and educate both sides on the cultural bottlenecks that exist. The service is available throughout New York State.

2007 to 2011

The Fossil Finders project engages children in classrooms across the country in an authentic investigation of Devonian fossils. Goals include supporting children in the use of evidence in constructing explanations of natural phenomena and motivating culturally and linguistically diverse groups of children to engage in learning science. The project is a collaboration of Cornell University Department of Education and the Paleontological Research Institution (PRI) in Ithaca, N.Y.

2007

Soil health defines the fitness of a soil for its intended use. In food production systems, a healthy soil is one that sustains plant productivity while maintaining environmental quality, promoting plant and animal health, and sustaining livelihoods. Evaluating soil health requires indicators that can be used to assess changes in soil condition over time and in response to soil management. Chemical, physical and biological indicators have all been proposed and many have been implemented successfully in soil health assessments in New York State.

2007 to 2013

There are about 10,000 species of grasses, and about one-third of them fall within the subfamily Pooideae, which is the most diverse group in temperate regions of the world. This subfamily includes species grown for human consumption (e.g., wheat, rye, and barley), animal forage (e.g., timothy, fescues, and bluegrasses), and weeds (several bromes and others) as well as important components of natural grasslands (e.g., stipas). The grasses fall within the more inclusive group of flowering plants known as monocots, which number about 60,000 species in total.

2007 to 2013

Through training in new research methods, this project helps to improve the research environment at IFORD, a regional demographic training institute in Cameroon.

2007

Kosher and halal food are big business and very important to about a ¼ of the worlds population. Much of the market serves people who are neither Jewish nor Muslim including vegetarians, vegans, and some specific allergies. This program serves consumers, government/NGOs, the food industry, and the religious supervisors by providing educational materials and a neutral third party intervenor.