469 projects

2009

Cornell NutritionWorks, at www.nutritionworks.cornell.edu, is an interactive, web-based continuing professional education program for nutrition and health practitioners, developed by the Division of Nutritional Sciences. One offering is a six-week in-depth online course, Preventing Childhood Obesity: An Ecological Approach.

2009 to 2011

Grower adoption of Cornell research-based recommendations including narrow plant spacing and alternative mulches dramatically reduce losses from bacterial bulb decay and increase profitability, thus sustaining the small-scale onion industry.

2009

This research program is aimed at improving the sustainability of the floriculture industry by developing practices that allow producers to produce high-value crops while using fertilizers, water and energy resources efficiently. For example, floriculture yield losses often result from poor irrigation water quality or improper fertilization practices. The improved efficiency of water and fertilizers has the potential to decrease fertilizer leaching, which will help protect our state's water resources.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, worked with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009 to 2013

Cornell University Cooperative Extension–NYC, Cornell soil scientists and Extension educators, State and local agencies, and community gardeners are working collaboratively on a 4-year research-Extension-community project that aims to assess soil and vegetable contaminant levels and human exposures through activities in urban community gardens, evaluating the effectiveness of management strategies to mitigate associated potential health risks, and translating research findings into effective education and public health action strategies to reduce exposures to soil contaminants and potential

2009

The Community Learning and Service Partnership (CLASP) is a participatory adult learning program designed to create and support reciprocal educational experiences between Cornell students and Cornell employees.

2009

The Polson Institute for Global Development is an endowed program based in the Department of Development Sociology. The Institute facilitates collaborative research by funding Research Working Groups and research seed grants. It also assists graduate student dissertation research, sponsors seminars, and outreach programs, including documentaries and the Rural New York Initiative, and hosts visiting scholars from throughout the world.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, is working with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009

Cornell Cooperative Extension educators increasingly find it challenging to make meaningful connections in a “too busy” world. In addition, they rarely have opportunities to engage with Cornell undergraduate. This is unfortunate for the educators, who benefit from the innovative engagement with the students, and for the students, who benefit from the real world connections and mentoring opportunities offered by interacting with educators.

2009

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC) developed, tested, and delivered an outdoor adventures-based "Scavenger Hunt" to educate the public about the ecology, natural landscape, culture, and history of Governors Island, the Hudson River, and the New York Harbor, involving New York Harbor School secondary students, and offered over two full days in September 2009 to the visiting public on Governors Island.