292 projects

2009

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC) developed, tested, and delivered an outdoor adventures-based "Scavenger Hunt" to educate the public about the ecology, natural landscape, culture, and history of Governors Island, the Hudson River, and the New York Harbor, involving New York Harbor School secondary students, and offered over two full days in September 2009 to the visiting public on Governors Island.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, is working with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009

New York has great potential to expand the cultivation of sustainable, perennial crops for the production of woody biomass—for heat and bioenergy and as a feedstock for biofuels—on under-used agricultural land.

2009 to 2012

Dairy Skills Training delivers information and hands-on training and experience to dairy farm workers in a variety of management areas in Western New York.

2009 to 2012

Low-impact logging is one part of the small-scale woodlot management approach. Woodland owners are able to utilize trees that specifically meet their objectives. They are not obligated to harvest a minimum volume, value, or area to satisfy the necessary operational thresholds associated with conventional forest harvesting. Owners benefit from a more thorough knowledge of how their woodland functions. Small-scale systems allow for a more thorough utilization of trees than is possible through conventional harvesting.

2009

Cornell research found certain that certain plants can be used to naturally suppress weeds. Some of these plants are attractive and represent a new market potential for NY greenhouse producers.

With funding from NYFVI we published a color brochure and website to describe these plants and promote their use to suppress weeds and reduce herbicide use in landscapes. We worked with growers and planted on-farm demonstration gardens at several locations across the state.

2009 to 2014

Alfalfa is a major economic crop in New York. It is often grown in rotation with corn where, on dairies, manure is applied to corn fields to meet nitrogen needs and build potassium, phosphorus, and sulfur levels. Questions arise related to the potassium and sulfur needs of alfalfa, given high fertilizer prices and reduced sulfur deposition.

2009

We organized a workshop to educate winery owners on waste management and water use planning to conserve water and protect the environment.

2009

Climate change and habitat loss are two of the most pressing environmental concerns of the 21st century, and there is a growing scientific consensus that they exert influences on bird populations at multiple scales, from local changes in population persistence to range-wide shifts in species distributions. Citizen Science data allow us to document exactly how species respond to these environmental changes throughout multiple regions and for many years.

2008 to 2015

Potato late blight is a particularly destructive disease that can explode out of control from time to time, as it did in 2009 in New York. The disease is dramatically influenced by weather, host resistance and proximity to a source of the pathogen. Typically, massive amounts of fungicide are used to prevent an epidemic. We have developed a web-based system that enables a grower to control this disease but with reduced amounts of fungicide. The system is available on the web and integrates the effect of weather, host resistance, fungicide and proximity to a source of the pathogen.