505 projects

2010 to 2011

The divisiveness around potential hydrofracking in the Marcellus Shale has opened a broader dialogue about how we are to responsibly meet our energy needs.

2010

The viticulture and enology steering committee created a quarterly electronic newsletter, Appellation Cornell, to provide in-depth research articles written for laypersons, as well as faculty profiles, student profiles, industry profiles, and brief articles to highlight research, extension, and teaching activities of Cornell's Viticulture and Enology Program to a national and international audience. In its first year, readership comprised 1000 to 1500 online subscribers in 45 states, three Canadian provinces, Europe, Australia, and New Zealand. Fifty articles were published in 2010.

2010 to 2011

Due to today’s relatively favorable commodity prices, farmers are trying to increase yields by installing pattern drainage systems, which have been proven to be a long term investment to improve soil conditions and increase yields. The North West New York Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team organized trials with tractor pulled tile plows and GPS control systems to evaluate their performance under WNY conditions.

2009

The Cornell Small Grains Breeding and Genetics Project has released a new soft white winter wheat variety called Hopkins with exceptionally high grain yield, grain quality and disease resistance. This variety is moderately resistant to fusarium head blight and is more sprout resistant than older varieties, thus increasing the efficiency of production for the farmer, and thereby resulting in higher profits.

2009 to 2011

Ongoing research project, initiated in 2005, on the implementation of New York state’s Universal PreKindergarten Policy, reached a high point this past January with the publication of the Yearbook of the Politics of Education Association as a special issue of the journal Education Policy. John Sipple, and two colleagues (Lisa McCabe, Cornell University's Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, and Carolyn Brown, Fordham University) were awarded (through a competitive process) the contract for editing the Yearbook.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, worked with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009 to 2013

Cornell University Cooperative Extension–NYC, Cornell soil scientists and Extension educators, State and local agencies, and community gardeners are working collaboratively on a 4-year research-Extension-community project that aims to assess soil and vegetable contaminant levels and human exposures through activities in urban community gardens, evaluating the effectiveness of management strategies to mitigate associated potential health risks, and translating research findings into effective education and public health action strategies to reduce exposures to soil contaminants and potential

2009

Plant pathologists from all over the Northeast collaborated in monitoring the outbreak of potato and tomato late blight that was initiated in June 2009 and continued into the fall. The reports of late blight occurrence warned commercial growers, home owners, and organic growers that the disease was prevalent and that mitigation procedures should be initiated.

2009

Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans infects both tomato and potato crops worldwide, and is responsible for major losses in both crops. Never before has late blight been introduced into such a wide area of the Northeast because of massive distribution from big box sale of infected tomato transplants. The public needed to be informed on this event because it affected every individual growing these crops, either commercially or for home garden enjoyment.

2009 to 2011

The neural networks that organize the motor pattern for locomotion are located in the spinal cord. These networks normally receive descending inputs from the brain that activate them and direct them to modify their output for variable behavior. These inputs are lost after spinal cord injury (SCI). As a consequence, the neurons begin to change their properties, in ways that might be deleterious to eventual recovery from SCI.