292 projects

2009 to 2011

An enormous interest exists for increasing the use of forests to supply energy. It is expected that many forest owners will be seeking ways to manage their forests to extract greater amounts of material from them, and the long-term health and sustainability of the forests will be greatly enhanced if these owners can be given a prescription for management that allows sustainable extraction of material without compromising the ability of the forest to increase carbon sequestration or the habitat support for maintenance and improvement of the biodiversity of species.

2009

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC) planned and delivered landscape horticulture professional development training courses of varying levels and intensity to multiple audiences, including grounds maintenance staff of the Roosevelt Island Operating Corporation (RIOC), professionals and green jobs trainees, and as part of the Sustainable South Bronx’s BEST Academy for green collar jobs training.

2009

Impact Summary: The Northeastern IPM Center, jointly administered by Cornell University and The Pennsylvania State University, works with New York, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, West Virginia, the District of Columbia, and the New England states. We foster the development and adoption of integrated pest management, managing pests in ways that generate economic, environmental, and human health benefits. We work in partnership with stakeholders from agricultural, urban, and rural settings to identify and address regional priorities for research, education, and outreach.

2009 to 2013

We currently have NSF funding from the Informal Science Education Program to support development of a new project, The YardMap Network, for which we are creating simple, visual mapping tools to gather data on habitat and sustainable practices in backyards, parks, and public spaces.

2009

The Network for Environment & Weather Awareness (NEWA), a network of electronic weather stations collecting data on farms, partners with the Northeast Regional Climate Center for data acquisition, quality control, weather information delivery and pest forecast model programming. NEWA users report that they can save, on average, up to $19,500 per year in spray costs and prevent, on average, up to $264,000 per year in crop loss as a direct result of using NEWA pest forecast models.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, worked with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009 to 2015

Production of fruits and vegetables requires animal, primarily bee, pollination. While honey bees are widely used for crop pollination, honey bee populations are in decline due to a combination of factors, including heavy pathogen load and pesticide use. Native bees—wild bees that occur naturally in the environment surrounding agricultural areas—are contributing significantly to crop pollination, but it is difficult to estimate their exact contribution, and limited resources exist for farmers who want to preserve their native bee fauna.

2009

A web-based, apple integrated pest management (IPM) decision support system was developed to facilitate pest management decisions. The system tracks seasonal development of insect pests using degree day (DD) developmental models. DD models and historical records are used to calculate tree phenological stage, pest stage, status and management advice. When a spray is recommended, a pesticide filter helps identify appropriate materials according to efficacy and type of management program. Predictions can be refined and adjusted by user-entered information obtained through field monitoring.

2009 to 2011

A Youth Grow summit served as the inspiration and opportunity to launch a new youth leadership project in the Cornell Garden-Based Learning Program.

2009

For the last seven years we have been actively developing non-chemical, reduced risk and organic cultural pest management programs for golf turf. This work has attracted great interest in the U.S. and abroad and has spurred growth in our evaluation of new technologies. Taken in concert, the existing research is ready for expanded application, and we have begun delivery via a number of educational strategies.