292 projects

2009

The Network for Environment & Weather Awareness (NEWA), a network of electronic weather stations collecting data on farms, partners with the Northeast Regional Climate Center for data acquisition, quality control, weather information delivery and pest forecast model programming. NEWA users report that they can save, on average, up to $19,500 per year in spray costs and prevent, on average, up to $264,000 per year in crop loss as a direct result of using NEWA pest forecast models.

2009 to 2011

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in collaboration with Cornell’s Department of Natural Resources, worked with residents and community organizations to develop, implement and evaluate a 3-year social science research and education project that will result in development of an urban forestry community engagement model, toolkit and resources that will be used by organizations to reach and empower people to be active stewards of their community’s trees and natural resources.

2009 to 2015

Production of fruits and vegetables requires animal, primarily bee, pollination. While honey bees are widely used for crop pollination, honey bee populations are in decline due to a combination of factors, including heavy pathogen load and pesticide use. Native bees—wild bees that occur naturally in the environment surrounding agricultural areas—are contributing significantly to crop pollination, but it is difficult to estimate their exact contribution, and limited resources exist for farmers who want to preserve their native bee fauna.

2009

A web-based, apple integrated pest management (IPM) decision support system was developed to facilitate pest management decisions. The system tracks seasonal development of insect pests using degree day (DD) developmental models. DD models and historical records are used to calculate tree phenological stage, pest stage, status and management advice. When a spray is recommended, a pesticide filter helps identify appropriate materials according to efficacy and type of management program. Predictions can be refined and adjusted by user-entered information obtained through field monitoring.

2009 to 2011

A Youth Grow summit served as the inspiration and opportunity to launch a new youth leadership project in the Cornell Garden-Based Learning Program.

2009

For the last seven years we have been actively developing non-chemical, reduced risk and organic cultural pest management programs for golf turf. This work has attracted great interest in the U.S. and abroad and has spurred growth in our evaluation of new technologies. Taken in concert, the existing research is ready for expanded application, and we have begun delivery via a number of educational strategies.

2009

Effective waste management can turn unwanted waste products into resources and reduce disposal costs. Waste management is part of every industry, but a waste product produced by one business can be a resource to another. Residuals from animal, food and yard waste, as well as industrial and household waste, have the potential to be valuable in agriculture and horticulture production as erosion control and nutrient and carbon sources, and in energy production and other industrial processes.

2009

In an effort to effectively distribute Integrated Pest Management information to extension educators in the Cornell Extension system an electronic newsletter was established. The purpose of this e-newsletter is to provide integrated pest management updates that will benefit members of the commercial horticulture industry.

2009 to 2014

When released into fields of sweet corn, the tiny wasp Trichogramma ostriniae is effective at suppressing infestations of the European corn borer, a serious pest of the crop. A single release made early in the season is generally all that is needed to reduce damage by 50 percent or more, and multiple releases have proven even more effective. This often results in a reduction in the need for insecticide treatments, thus minimizing risks to health and the environment. The technique is effective in sweet corn and also peppers and potatoes.

2009 to 2010

Cornell University Cooperative Extension-NYC (CUCE-NYC), in partnership with Central Park Conservancy, planned, delivered and evaluated an intensive 16-session certification course for staff and volunteers of Central Park and other City parks through interactive and hands-on classroom/lab and field instruction in soils, plants, pest management, and other subjects related to managing urban landscapes sustainably.