734 projects

2012

The Cornell Small Grains Breeding and Genetics Project has released a new soft red winter wheat variety called Otsego with exceptionally high grain yield, grain quality and disease resistance. This variety is moderately resistant to fusarium head blight and is more sprout resistant than white wheat varieties, thus increasing the efficiency of production for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits.

2012 to 2014

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, originally from Asia, is an invasive fruit fly that became established in NY and surrounding states in autumn of 2011. Unlike other fruit flies that typically only infest overripe and rotten fruit, female SWD oviposit in ripe fruit, thereby making them unmarketable. Economic loss projections for NY fruit are estimated at $5M. Soft-skinned fruits are at greatest risk.

2012

When "super storm" Sandy opened a new inlet on the south shore of Long Island, threatening developed areas, the National Park Service requested New York Sea Grant's coastal processes specialist to assist their inter-agency Breach Assessment Team, composed of 35 federal, state and local officials, in evaluating the situation and managing the feature. The specialist provided the group with information on potential breach impacts and worked with university researchers to develop a monitoring program that would provide information needed to properly manage the breach.

2012

This project takes an in-depth look at the various venues through which globalization can impact labor standards in developing countries.

2012 to 2013

While New York State is urging coastal property owners and managers to use living shorelines as the preferred method for erosion control for environmental reasons, these audiences didn't have the information they needed to make intelligent choices regarding the suitability of this approach for their particular sites. NY Sea Grant organized a workshop that brought together top experts in this field to share their expertise with New York audiences.

2012 to 2015

This project leverages YardMap, a social network for people interested in urban backyard habitat, by working with groups of neighboring property owners to manage their individual properties based on common, consensus-based goals. This project will develop outreach, community-based strategies, and community planning and design methods and tools by working with three communities in New York state to develop schematic plans that seek to enhance the condition of urban habitats on properties of participating landowners for neighborhood-scale benefits.

2012

Greenhouse growers in NYS are looking for educational opportunities to learn more about managing their crops to maximize profitability. Annual hands-on workshops in Ithaca were very well received as a method to extend crop management information.

This project brings the workshops to the producers rather than vice versa. Each traveling workshop is adapted to local needs and provides the opportunity to apply the knowledge in a real world setting with a grower-led greenhouse tour.

2012 to 2013

Professional development and skill maintenance is critical to my role as a technical liaison and benefits planning educator. This takes place in a variety of ways: updating materials, preparing new papers and presenting papers and attending conferences.

2012

Fertilizers prices increase and availability to rural communities in developing countries is a challenge to increasing food production. This project is generating the economic, social and biophysical knowledge base for the development of indigenous fertilizers that provide local business opportunities, are as or more effective and less expensive than imported fertilizers. Resource mapping identifies local food and processing wastes that are rich in nutrients. Innovative yet simple technology based on thermochemical and enzymatic conversion is utilized and acceptance by farmers tested. 

2012 to 2015

Small grains provide multiple benefits to organic farms, but are often underutilized because of their relatively low economic value. Our value added grains project has added value in multiple ways to wheat and specialty grain crops to substantially increase their production and enhance the diversity and sustainability of organic farms. By providing the farmer with rotation options the efficiency of production is increased for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits. Specialty grains grown organically are environmentally friendly crops and help reduce soil erosion.