505 projects

2012

We are studying the patterns of attack by insect herbivores on plants in order to both more fully understand why some plants are vulnerable to herbivory and to use our understanding to manipulate such interactions in pest control. The work involves field biology, chemical ecology, genetics and entomology. We study the interactions between plants and their pests and strongly believe in the synergy between basic and applied work.

2012

The Cornell Small Grains Breeding and Genetics Project has released a new soft red winter wheat variety called Otsego with exceptionally high grain yield, grain quality and disease resistance. This variety is moderately resistant to fusarium head blight and is more sprout resistant than white wheat varieties, thus increasing the efficiency of production for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits.

2012 to 2013

Wineries are changing their tasting sheets as a result of our findings. They are only including objective descriptors in the tasting sheets. The wineries have increased sales performance a a result.

2012 to 2014

The overarching goal of this project is to enhance farm labor stability by engaging workers and employers in a joint exploration of opportunities for advancement and retention. The objectives are: 1) to engage farmworkers in analyzing their current labor situation and potential retention strategies through focus groups;
2) to facilitate discussions with farmers and farm managers about the challenges and opportunities for retaining workers;

2012 to 2014

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, originally from Asia, is an invasive fruit fly that became established in NY and surrounding states in autumn of 2011. Unlike other fruit flies that typically only infest overripe and rotten fruit, female SWD oviposit in ripe fruit, thereby making them unmarketable. Economic loss projections for NY fruit are estimated at $5M. Soft-skinned fruits are at greatest risk.

2012 to 2015

This project leverages YardMap, a social network for people interested in urban backyard habitat, by working with groups of neighboring property owners to manage their individual properties based on common, consensus-based goals. This project will develop outreach, community-based strategies, and community planning and design methods and tools by working with three communities in New York state to develop schematic plans that seek to enhance the condition of urban habitats on properties of participating landowners for neighborhood-scale benefits.

2012 to 2013

A field study was established in 2012 to evaluate the effect that vigorous cultivation (rototilling) may have on improving the efficacy of currently registered herbicides. The target weed, mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris), has deep rhizomes that often allow it to escape complete control with available herbicides. If a late summer rototilling can reduce the size of the rhizomes and bring them closer to the surface, then fall-applied herbicides should be more effective in preventing the smaller rhizomes from regenerating shoots the following spring.

2012

The Cornell Small Grains Breeding and Genetics Project has released a new spring oat variety called Corral with exceptionally high grain yield and disease resistance. This variety is resistant to barley yellow dwarf virus and is more lodging resistant than other oat varieties, thus increasing the efficiency of production for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits.

2012

This project takes an in-depth look at the various venues through which globalization can impact labor standards in developing countries.

2012 to 2015

Small grains provide multiple benefits to organic farms, but are often underutilized because of their relatively low economic value. Our value added grains project has added value in multiple ways to wheat and specialty grain crops to substantially increase their production and enhance the diversity and sustainability of organic farms. By providing the farmer with rotation options the efficiency of production is increased for the farmer and thereby resulting in higher profits. Specialty grains grown organically are environmentally friendly crops and help reduce soil erosion.