505 projects

2014 to 2020

The new disease-resistant Geneva rootstocks have the potential to become the most important apple rootstocks in the world over the next decade. They provide high production efficiency, which will keep U.S. apple growers competitive, but they also provide insurance against devastating loses due to fire blight.

2014 to 2017

Eutrophication associated with excess nutrient pollution in shallow marine ecosystems is poorly understood relative to deeper systems; this project investigates various feedbacks that may occur during eutrophication that either aggravate or partially mitigate the effects of nutrient pollution in a shallow estuary. A large reduction in nitrogen loading from the watershed allows a unique opportunity to also study the start of ecosystem recovery.

2013 to 2014

A working group of applied and basic researchers has been established to coordinate research and extension regarding a highly damaging new disease of boxwood. University and USDA-ARS workers studying disease management and epidemiology, pathogen survival and genetics are collaborating closely to develop a highly focused effort resulting in new information and its dissemination.

2013 to 2018

The sensory representation of the external chemical world in the brain is a translation of chemical features into patterns of brain activity. It is the nature these patterns—how that are established by stimulant patterns, how they vary in a population, and ultimately how they interact with other brain functions, e.g. emotions (joy) or behavior (buying wine)—that is the object of our research. We study aroma perception in order to provide information about food composition to producers that will allow them to produce likable, healthy and more profitable products.

2013 to 2016

The Hawaiian Islands support the greatest levels of biodiversity per unit area in the World. The geological history of the archipelago has allowed certain early colonizing groups to undergo adaptive radiations on successively emergent volcanic islands. I have been studying all of the estimated 425 native species of the beetle family Carabidae (predaceous carabid beetles), and have studied the patterns of extinction in various groups based on historical and present-day collections from the field. Recent collaboration with Dr.

2013 to 2015

Help the US public understand land grabs and transfer and interdependencies between Global North and Global South.

2013 to 2015

The project seeks to sustainably graduate at least 50,000 food insecure households in four regions in Ethiopia. The aim is is to enhance the capacity of smallholders to withstand social and environmental shocks and improve their productivity.

2013 to 2014

The overall goal of the research in my lab is to understand the basis of inheritance in plants by studying the mechanisms of meiosis, particularly pairing of homologous chromosomes and meiotic recombination. Both pairing and recombination are critical for correct segregation of chromosomes into gametes. We want to understand these processes at the molecular level. This basic research will provide a platform for investigations on how meiotic processes can be modified to improve plant breeding methods.

2012

Worksite Wellness Resources are offered by many US corporations and can be an effective tool in recruiting and retaining workers and in helping them to maintain solid work performance. Little is known about the access of such resources to workers with disabilities. This survey research looks at access to wellness resources from the perspective of employees with disabilities.

2012 to 2014

The overarching goal of this project is to enhance farm labor stability by engaging workers and employers in a joint exploration of opportunities for advancement and retention. The objectives are: 1) to engage farmworkers in analyzing their current labor situation and potential retention strategies through focus groups;
2) to facilitate discussions with farmers and farm managers about the challenges and opportunities for retaining workers;