292 projects

2014 to 2017

Eutrophication associated with excess nutrient pollution in shallow marine ecosystems is poorly understood relative to deeper systems; this project investigates various feedbacks that may occur during eutrophication that either aggravate or partially mitigate the effects of nutrient pollution in a shallow estuary. A large reduction in nitrogen loading from the watershed allows a unique opportunity to also study the start of ecosystem recovery.

2013 to 2014

A working group of applied and basic researchers has been established to coordinate research and extension regarding a highly damaging new disease of boxwood. University and USDA-ARS workers studying disease management and epidemiology, pathogen survival and genetics are collaborating closely to develop a highly focused effort resulting in new information and its dissemination.

2013 to 2016

The Hawaiian Islands support the greatest levels of biodiversity per unit area in the World. The geological history of the archipelago has allowed certain early colonizing groups to undergo adaptive radiations on successively emergent volcanic islands. I have been studying all of the estimated 425 native species of the beetle family Carabidae (predaceous carabid beetles), and have studied the patterns of extinction in various groups based on historical and present-day collections from the field. Recent collaboration with Dr.

2013 to 2015

The project seeks to sustainably graduate at least 50,000 food insecure households in four regions in Ethiopia. The aim is is to enhance the capacity of smallholders to withstand social and environmental shocks and improve their productivity.

2013 to 2015

Help the US public understand land grabs and transfer and interdependencies between Global North and Global South.

2012 to 2014

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, originally from Asia, is an invasive fruit fly that became established in NY and surrounding states in autumn of 2011. Unlike other fruit flies that typically only infest overripe and rotten fruit, female SWD oviposit in ripe fruit, thereby making them unmarketable. Economic loss projections for NY fruit are estimated at $5M. Soft-skinned fruits are at greatest risk.

2012

Greenhouse growers in NYS are looking for educational opportunities to learn more about managing their crops to maximize profitability. Annual hands-on workshops in Ithaca were very well received as a method to extend crop management information.

This project brings the workshops to the producers rather than vice versa. Each traveling workshop is adapted to local needs and provides the opportunity to apply the knowledge in a real world setting with a grower-led greenhouse tour.

2012 to 2013

While New York State is urging coastal property owners and managers to use living shorelines as the preferred method for erosion control for environmental reasons, these audiences didn't have the information they needed to make intelligent choices regarding the suitability of this approach for their particular sites. NY Sea Grant organized a workshop that brought together top experts in this field to share their expertise with New York audiences.

2012

We are studying the patterns of attack by insect herbivores on plants in order to both more fully understand why some plants are vulnerable to herbivory and to use our understanding to manipulate such interactions in pest control. The work involves field biology, chemical ecology, genetics and entomology. We study the interactions between plants and their pests and strongly believe in the synergy between basic and applied work.

2012 to 2014

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) educators are Cornell University’s front line in helping New York field crop producer clientele with crop production and pest management issues. Keeping CCE personnel informed on the latest information and developments helps us meet Cornell’s high standards for extension outreach and provides clientele with quality, pertinent, timely, and user-friendly programs and resources that maximize our educational impacts.