292 projects

2014 to 2017

Eutrophication associated with excess nutrient pollution in shallow marine ecosystems is poorly understood relative to deeper systems; this project investigates various feedbacks that may occur during eutrophication that either aggravate or partially mitigate the effects of nutrient pollution in a shallow estuary. A large reduction in nitrogen loading from the watershed allows a unique opportunity to also study the start of ecosystem recovery.

2013 to 2016

The Hawaiian Islands support the greatest levels of biodiversity per unit area in the World. The geological history of the archipelago has allowed certain early colonizing groups to undergo adaptive radiations on successively emergent volcanic islands. I have been studying all of the estimated 425 native species of the beetle family Carabidae (predaceous carabid beetles), and have studied the patterns of extinction in various groups based on historical and present-day collections from the field. Recent collaboration with Dr.

2013 to 2015

The project seeks to sustainably graduate at least 50,000 food insecure households in four regions in Ethiopia. The aim is is to enhance the capacity of smallholders to withstand social and environmental shocks and improve their productivity.

2013 to 2015

Help the US public understand land grabs and transfer and interdependencies between Global North and Global South.

2013 to 2014

A working group of applied and basic researchers has been established to coordinate research and extension regarding a highly damaging new disease of boxwood. University and USDA-ARS workers studying disease management and epidemiology, pathogen survival and genetics are collaborating closely to develop a highly focused effort resulting in new information and its dissemination.

2012 to 2014

Cornell Cooperative Extension (CCE) educators are Cornell University’s front line in helping New York field crop producer clientele with crop production and pest management issues. Keeping CCE personnel informed on the latest information and developments helps us meet Cornell’s high standards for extension outreach and provides clientele with quality, pertinent, timely, and user-friendly programs and resources that maximize our educational impacts.

2012

When "super storm" Sandy opened a new inlet on the south shore of Long Island, threatening developed areas, the National Park Service requested New York Sea Grant's coastal processes specialist to assist their inter-agency Breach Assessment Team, composed of 35 federal, state and local officials, in evaluating the situation and managing the feature. The specialist provided the group with information on potential breach impacts and worked with university researchers to develop a monitoring program that would provide information needed to properly manage the breach.

2012 to 2015

This project leverages YardMap, a social network for people interested in urban backyard habitat, by working with groups of neighboring property owners to manage their individual properties based on common, consensus-based goals. This project will develop outreach, community-based strategies, and community planning and design methods and tools by working with three communities in New York state to develop schematic plans that seek to enhance the condition of urban habitats on properties of participating landowners for neighborhood-scale benefits.

2012

Fertilizers prices increase and availability to rural communities in developing countries is a challenge to increasing food production. This project is generating the economic, social and biophysical knowledge base for the development of indigenous fertilizers that provide local business opportunities, are as or more effective and less expensive than imported fertilizers. Resource mapping identifies local food and processing wastes that are rich in nutrients. Innovative yet simple technology based on thermochemical and enzymatic conversion is utilized and acceptance by farmers tested. 

2012 to 2014

Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) Drosophila suzukii, originally from Asia, is an invasive fruit fly that became established in NY and surrounding states in autumn of 2011. Unlike other fruit flies that typically only infest overripe and rotten fruit, female SWD oviposit in ripe fruit, thereby making them unmarketable. Economic loss projections for NY fruit are estimated at $5M. Soft-skinned fruits are at greatest risk.